Monday, February 6, 2017

The Corporate Minimalist

I have been watching the documentary Minimalism: A Documentary About the Important Things. The first time was two Fridays ago, and then I watched it again this weekend. It is quite the hit on Netflix.  Ironically, the first time I watched it instead of creating my capsule wardrobe... (don't worry I made it back to my capsule) But I found the documentary inspiring, and it put together many pieces of minimalism I have been pondering over the last year or so. (as seen here and here and here oh and here)

The focus of the documentary is figuring out what drives us to consume and how that affects our lives. It also provides a glimpse of what our life may look like without all the material items. It is summed up like this: "We spend so much time on the hunt, but nothing ever quite does it for us. We get so wrapped up in the hunt that it makes us miserable." ~Dan Harris. 

The parting words of the documentary provide a guide to living minimalist: "Love people and use things, not the other way around."

But there is also an underlying theme in the documentary, that thoughtless consumption is synonymous with corporate employment. I think that most of the individuals in the documentary hated their jobs and bought stuff to compensate. Many of them quit their office jobs to become a blogger/writer/traveler promoting the minimalism movement. I can definitely see the association between the two, especially if your goal of employment is to gain money. But what happens to people like me, people who don't want to become bloggers/writers/world travelers? I've done the former and it's lonely. And while I may not love the job I come to now, I definitely like coming to an office, working with people, solving difficult problems and having structure in my life. 

Via Apartment Therapy
I definitely see how minimalism and a less corporate employment fit well together, especially if we are working with the purpose to acquire money. Removing the need for money, removes the dependency for the corporate job. And if we hate our job, that can be very freeing. 

I am going to try and argue that a minimalist lifestyle in a corporate job can work well together - just as well as becoming a minimalist to quitting the corporate 'rat race' fits together. See in my corporate job, I have limited free time.  I would like to spend that time doing things, connecting with people outside of work, getting into nature, not buying or taking care of material goods I own. So the less I own, the more time I can spend doing the things I love. 

So here is my experiment - not giving up my day job (which takes up my days and nights), but giving up the shopping. I predict this will have a significant effect on my life, because I find myself spending large portions of my free time researching, hunting, buying and storing material items. I am interested and worried to see what I spend my time on when I don't spend it on the hunt. 

So in the last week and a half, I have taken some steps down the corporate minimalism path:
  1. Returned ~$1,000 worth of clothing, I somehow bought over the past two weeks ($500 of which I only took home to 'try on', so was going to be returned anyway)
  2. Built a Capsule Wardrobe - Well I have built 2 capsule wardrobes. Because I wear suits to work and there is no crossover between work apparel and lifestyle apparel, I had to create two separate capsules. Both are less than 30 items. (more on that another day) 
  3. Made a pledge to not buy anything for 3 months. This is not confined to clothing, rather I am going to attempt to not purchase any material item that is not consumable and immediately required (ex. I am not going to buy my 10th bottle of body cream). 
  4. Unfollowed instagram accounts that are selling me items
  5. Went through 1/2 of my kitchen and removed items that did not "spark joy". I filled two medium sized boxes and kept quite a few items (I'm definitely not strictly following the Mari Kondo Method). Despite the limited reduction, I feel decluttered already
Via Apartment Therapy

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